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Craftspersons

Durry Weaving, UP
Wood Toy Art, UP
Shibori Embrodiery, Rajasthan
Batik textile art, Bengal
Gond art, Madhya Pradesh
Bandhani Textile art, Gujarat
Wood inlay work, Uttar Pradesh
Wood carving, Delhi
Miniature art, Delhi
Terracotta art, Delhi
Silver Filigree work, Odisha
Ceramic craft, Maharashtra
Madhubani art, Bihar
Wire craft, Delhi
Embroidery, Rajasthan
Sanjhi paper art, UP, Rajasthan
Zardozi hand embroidery, Delhi
Glass craft, Uttar Pradesh
Sanjhi craft, Uttar Pradesh
Phad art, Rajasthan
Bamboo craft, Delhi
Chennapatna Lathe lacquer work, Karnataka
Gond art, Madhya Pradesh
Kavad art, Rajasthan
Godna art, Bihar
Seashell craft, Bengal
Paddy craft, Odisha
Handloom weaving, Telangana
Paper mache art, J&K
Clay work, Goa
Handloom weaving, Himachal Pradesh
Paper mache art, Madhya Pradesh
Handmade stationery, Delhi
Kani Sozni embroidery, J&K
Kani Sozni embroidery, J&K
Dhokra craft, Bengal
Miniature art, Rajasthan
Rug weaving, Rajasthan
Warli art, Maharashtra

Date & Time

Thu, 27 Feb 2020 11:00 am Thu, 5 Mar 2020 8:00 pm
Free Entry

Location

Bangalore International Centre
7, 4th Main Road, Domlur II Stage
Bengaluru, Karnataka 560 071 India
View Map

Contact

+91 98865 99675 bic@bangaloreinternationalcentre.org

Mahatma Gandhi gave special emphasis to Indias rural crafts people to sustain their traditional livelihoods and strengthen village economies. Use of natural materials and inter dependence of communities both protected the environment and provided dignified and unified work in the midst of a fast mechanisation age. Human worth and selfreliance were keystones of Gandhis vision of Swaraj. Dastkari Haat Samiti’s craftspeople and artists use their creative imagination and age-old skills to present an imaginative and unique collection of handmade works of Gandhi in a large variety of artistic skills. This exhibition was first held at the Indira Gandhi Centre for the Arts from 2nd October ’19 to celebrate Gandhi Jayanti

40 craftspersonsartists will exhibit 80 works. Of these 25 persons will be attending the event to showcase their creations in art, craft and textiles. 

Art: Godna, Gond, Warli, Rajasthani miniature, Madhubani, Kavad, Phad, Kashmiri art, painted terracotta

Textiles: Handloom weaving, tie & dye, Shibori , Kashmiri  Sozni embroidery, Batik combined with Kantha embroidery,  Rug weaving,  Zari work

Crafts: Sanjhi paper cut, silver filigree work, paddy husk with thread work, glass work, wood carving, lathework, painted toys, block carving, wire work, plaster of paris  sculpture, ceramic craft, Dhokra metal craft, clay work, bamboo weaving, shell work, stationery hand bound in handmade paper, wood and metal craft

Talk schedule: 

March 2020 (Sunday) / 11:30 AMTalk and discussions on photography by Chirodeep Chaudhuri
March 2020 (Monday) / 7:30 PMPresentation on Gandhi by artist Subodh Kerkar

Imagining Gandhi Through Craft is an exhibition conceived, commissioned, guided and organised by the Dastkari Haat Samiti.

Dastkari Haat Samiti is a national association of Indian crafts persons founded in 1986. It is a collective platform to provide marketing and promotional opportunities to enhance livelihoods in the craft sector and sustain India’s environmental and cultural heritage. It engages in multi-faceted and innovative strategies to provide greater respect and revenue for India’s craft, textile traditional art practitioners.

Supported by-

 

 

Craftspersons

 

 

Abdul Kalam

Durry Weaving, UP

Abdul Kalam from Bhadohi is a skilled designer and weaver of durries. He highly innovative and has woven calligraphy after being inspired by Egypt. Has also replicated iconic Hindi film posters on carpets. His image of Gandhi is in the knotted carpet technique. Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here

Ajeet Kumar Vishwakarma

Wood Toy Art, UP

The wooden toy craft of Banaras is not widely known. It is usually a mix of religious figures and toys. Some are hand carved and others are on lathe-turned wood. The craftsman’s seated figure of Gandhi is hand carved and painted. The artist is aspirational and self-educated.

Amrita Choudhary

Shibori Embrodiery, Rajasthan

Karthik Manna

Batik textile art, Bengal

This textile artist engaged in a crafts and skills exchange programme with Indonesian batik artists and learnt new techniques. His work on Gandhi combines Indian and Indonesian design ideas in his work with kantha embroidery of Bengal.

Venkat Raman Singh Shyam

Gond art, Madhya Pradesh

The artist has grown from a minor player in the Gond art world to one of its leading artists and has illustrated the story of his life in a beautiful book. His works on Gandhi are a special tribute for this exhibition, highlighting Gandhi’s appeal across communities.

Mahamad Hamza Hasan Khatri

Bandhani Textile art, Gujarat

Hamza Khatri is a young artist in the bandhni (tie & dye) technique. He has undergone formal design training to create saris and fashion garments. This is his first experiment with textile portraiture.

Mohd Arshad Kafeel

Wood inlay work, Uttar Pradesh

Arshad is a master block maker from Pilakhua, who comes from a family of national awardees. He carves, engraves and inlays images in bone, brass, steel and silver. Gandhi in plain carving and brass inlay are his first human subjects instead of his usual flora, fauna and geometric themes.

Mohd Tahir

Wood carving, Delhi

Tahir is a block maker who offers his hand carved works for printing or for use as decorative doorknobs and handles. They can also be mounted on pedestals as mementos.

Sneh Gangal

Miniature art, Delhi

Sneh Gangal is a versatile artist who works in traditional and contemporary styles with imaginative ideas and a finely executed technique. Her Gandhi plaques are a mix of the traditional and contemporary.

Rajesh Roy

Terracotta art, Delhi

Rajesh Roy has the creative flair of a Bengali artist. He has a sensitive imagination, effectively combining terracotta craft and painting in multiple ways. His portrait of Gandhi is a mosaic of painted terracotta squares.

Syed Ruksar Ali

Silver Filigree work, Odisha

Ruksar Ali is known for his silver filigree work typical of Odisha. The artist creates fine jewelry and also makes large silver covered thrones for deities during the puja season in Puri.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

Vanmala Jain

Ceramic craft, Maharashtra

Vanmala Jain was trained at the National Institute of Design. She works in the slums of Mumbai to empower people through ceramic craft in an organization named Kuprkabi. They make decorative and funky objects which attract young people towards the craft world and to care about the underprivileged. Plaques and magnets invoking Gandhi add a range of playfulness to the Gandhi theme.

Remant Kumar Mishra

Madhubani art, Bihar

Remant is an enterprising Mithila artist who can put his pen and brush to any theme or subject. He attracts an enthusiastic audience with his own interpretations of life around him. This is the first time he has attempted to portray Gandhi in multiple situations, dressing him innovatively in decorative textiles.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

Mohd Rafeeq

Wire craft, Delhi

Rafeeq began crafting wire twenty years ago, making key rings and knick knacks to sell at small kiosks. After interacting with an international wire artist from Israel in 2018 he has blossomed into an imaginative and skilled artist taking daring leaps into unexplored territory.

Disha Shekawati

Embroidery, Rajasthan

Disha is a rural organization of women who create their own floral and geometric designs in machine embroidery to produce saris and stoles for sale at marketing events. They engaged with imagery and an evocative portrait of Gandhi as a new exploration of their talents.

Ram Soni

Sanjhi paper art, UP, Rajasthan

Ram Soni is a well-known Sanjhi paper-cut artist who makes elaborately patterned art works and large panels out of paper as a departure from ritualistic expressions for temples in Brindavan. He needs only a pair of scissors as his tool. His portrait of Gandhi is simple and elegant without any elaborate decoration to signify Gandhi’s simple life.

Ramachandran Nair

Zardozi hand embroidery, Delhi

A zari artist from Kerala living in Delhi took up the challenge of creating Gandhi with the materials that are usually used for bridal outfits.

Mahesh Kumar Kushwah

Glass craft, Uttar Pradesh

The artist is a glass-worker from Firozabad who was trained to innovate in glass work at National Institute of Design. He fashions images of Gandhi, Lord Ganesha, birds or animals on demand.

Vijay Soni

Sanjhi craft, Uttar Pradesh

Vijay Soni belongs to a family of crafts persons who practice the rare craft of Sanjhi. Before the craft became well-known such artists had resorted to cutting stencil images on plastic sheets, but today they prefer handmade paper which enhances the art. Gandhi had promoted the use of handmade paper with great enthusiasm.

Kalyan Joshi

Phad art, Rajasthan

Traditionally Phad painters have a history of painting large panels depicting the life of heroic historical figures. These are used as backdrops for folk performances in Rajasthan. Now Phad artists have also miniaturized their works, bringing fine lines and detailing into new themes. Gandhi’s experience in the train in South Africa is shown by this senior artist in the Phad style.

Vivekananda Bagchi

Bamboo craft, Delhi

A craftsperson who works on a variety of bamboo products, Bagchi has a large workshop in Delhi. His art and his skill belong to his home state of West Bengal. This is the first time he has attempted an image of Gandhi. A combination of techniques in bamboo imitate textile weaves in his skilled hands.

Noor Salma

Chennapatna Lathe lacquer work, Karnataka

Noor Salma belongs to a Muslim family where girls do not usually follow their father’s practice of lathe- turned woodwork. She runs a successful business of making home accessories, jewelry and toys. Her tribute to Gandhi represents wood craft from Chennapatna.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

 

Suresh Kumar Dhurve

Gond art, Madhya Pradesh

The Gond art tradition is gaining popularity across the world. Each artist has a similar technique but with their own signature styles and subject matter. Dhurve has chosen to keep certain parts of his work on Gandhi in black and white while other parts of the same painting are in colour. It depicts Gandhi journeying on foot across the villages of India.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

 

Satya Narayan

Kavad art, Rajasthan

Satya Narayan works on the traditional art of kavad painting. Kavads are mobile story telling devices. The artist also decorates old pieces of furniture. Here he has told the story of Gandhi on a Kavad with multiple panels to illustrate different aspects of Gandhi’s life as an educational tool for children.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

 

Ranjit Kumar Paswan

Godna art, Bihar

The artist belongs to the community of Godana painters who were tattoo artists. Although they live in close proximity to the Madhubani artist community, they have a different social background and history of their art. Most of their work is in black and white, indicating the origin of tattooing.  They created tattoos as body decorations for those extremely poor communities who could not afford jewelry. As is the work on Gandhi, most Godana imagery involves nature in many forms.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

 

Kinkar Ghosh

Seashell craft, Bengal

West Bengal is known for its sea shell work for jewelry or decorative table top accessories. The artist has never attempted a portrait of Gandhi. He brings out the subtle and changing colors of shells surrounding dramatic renderings of Gandhi.

Hare Krushna Nayak

Paddy craft, Odisha

The artist used to be a handloom weaver until he had a health problem. His creative urges led him and his family members to using paddy husk and thread to make fine garlands which are then shaped into images. His ingenuity allows him to create figures of any deity or well-known figure. The unique Gandhi figure used 630 metres of paddy husk garlands and took two and a half months to create.

Gajam Goverdhan

Handloom weaving, Telangana

The weaver of the shimmering Gandhi textile is a towering figure in world of handlooms. He has been experimenting with scripts and first wove a Ganesha figure in Telugu calligraphy. He has now used Gandhi’s favorite’s bhajan to shape the image of Gandhi in zari thread woven into fine unbleached cotton yarn.

Featured on Google Arts & Culture digital platform G.co/craftedinindia here.

 

Hakim Gulam Mohd

Paper mache art, J&K

Hakim Gulam Mohd. has practiced the fine art of papier-machie painting for many decades. He has understood the value of innovation and experimented with many kinds of design sensibilities to bring variety to his work.

Subodh Kerkar

Clay work, Goa

Subodh Kerkar is an outstanding sculptor and creative inspiration to many people in multiple art and craft forms. He has a passion for the Gandhi story. Gandhi in ‘neel’ is among his new creations. He is the founder of the Museum of Goa.

Anshul Malhotra

Handloom weaving, Himachal Pradesh

Anshul Malhotra is a weaver of shawls from Kullu who started her professional life as a textile engineer.  Her contribution to the Gandhi exhibition is a woven scripted shawl in woolen yarn with traditional designs of the community at both ends.

Trilok Thakur

Paper mache art, Madhya Pradesh

Trilok Thakur is a paper-machie artist from Ujjain. His family has been practicing fine painting for generations. Thakur specializes in creating paper-mache birds which he paints exactly according to the famed Dr. Salim Ali’s book on Indian Birds. His tribute is a statuette of Gandhi with a bronzed finish.

Naresh Kumar

Handmade stationery, Delhi

Naresh Kumar has embraced the concept of reusing and recycling by collecting newspapers and journals in many regional languages to cover notebooks, some of which are bound with bamboo and jute thread. He designed handmade paper notebooks featuring Gandhi for this exhibition.

Mahboob Ali Beigh

Kani Sozni embroidery, J&K

This highly skilled embroiderer from Kashmir comes from a family with many award winners in Kani sozni work. He uses silk thread on pashmina fabric to create a work that is unique in concept and design.  It depicts a portion of the map of India, with floral embroidery motifs typical of Kashmir representing the people of India looking up at Gandhi.

Ghulam Mohammad Beigh

Kani Sozni embroidery, J&K

The entire Beigh family is known for its skilled hand embroidery in Kashmir. Finely executed stitches merge to form a portrait of Gandhi in which the stitches are so fine and closely laid together that it appears to be woven or machine-embroidered.

 

Shyamji Vankar

Gujarat

Belonging to a talented family of handloom weavers in the semi-desert region of Kutch, Shamji has constantly explored, researched and innovated with his craft. His exhibits in khadi of Gandhi were commissioned and woven for a special show in the United Kingdom.

Rajiv Kumar Maity

Dhokra craft, Bengal

Dhokra is an ancient craft form using the lost wax technique. Moving away from tribal imagery, Maity experiments with Gandhi images for the first time.

Mohan Prajapati

Miniature art, Rajasthan

A fine miniature artist from Jaipur offers his art towards creating an unforgettable image of Gandhi reading a newspaper which combines a natural form with a sophisticated skill and fine brushwork.

Showbik Daw

Bengal

The artist combines wood and metal to make contemporary artifacts for everyday use. Gandhi is a new subject as a source of his inspiration.

Wahid Khan

Rug weaving, Rajasthan

Wahid Khan wove his experiences in jail and connects his life to the life of Gandhi in the lessons he has learned. He wove i symbols of Gandhi like his dhoti, charkha, his corner jail cell, books, and other symbols from life in jail like a potli, a banyan tree from the yard, a bucket, vessels they used to make food and tea, the gate to the jail and even birds eating leftover meals. He believes that in his time in prison he connected with himself, learned about respect, appreciation for the simple things in life. He could experience every emotion vividly, and says that in prison you have no choice but to face your problems and learn. To the people that see his rug he says, “For life to be enjoyed to the fullest, you must learn to take it seriously. Even in laughter, enjoy it for what it is, do not lose yourself in stretching it out to something that may have consequences.” The work is titled “Zindagi ki Seekh”

Anil Chaitya Vangad

Warli art, Maharashtra

Warli artists have a distinctive style of painting using only one of three colours as the base over which they paint multiple stories with rice paste. Anil Vangad depicts many events in the life of Gandhi during the freedom movement.